Aim of our schemes:
"developing climbers through quality coaching"



NICAS and NIBAS are UK-wide schemes designed to promote climbing development and accredit individual achievement on artificial climbing structures. They're a starting point for people wishing to take up climbing and mountaineering, from novice to experienced, starting from age 7.

What are the awards?



We currently offer two awards, known as NICAS (National Indoor Climbing Award Scheme) and NIBAS (National Indoor Bouldering Award Scheme).

NICAS is a "climbing" award which involves climbing with ropes and harnesses. This is usually done with two people, one climbing, and one holding the rope and lowering the climber (the belayer).Belaying techniques are a key part of NICAS.

NIBAS is a "bouldering" award. Bouldering is a form of climbing usually practised on small rock boulders, or at indoor walls. Bouldering is carried out at lower heights than roped climbing. The "boulderer" is able to climb down or jump down from the wall (so ropes and harnesses are not required).

We like The Climbing Works' description of what bouldering is (in summary, many things to many people!)

Structure of NICAS & NIBAS



NICAS certificatesNICAS and NIBAS each have five progressive levels of award for complete novices to expert climbers. The scheme is split into two parts and takes a minimum of 80 hours to complete Levels 1 to 4 and an additional year to complete Level 5. Part one contains Levels 1 to 3 and part two contains Levels 4 and 5.

When you register with an Accredited Centre you receive a logbook for Levels 1-3. Later you will be offered a booklet for Levels 4 & 5. A binder is available separately to keep the booklets and additional papers pristine. You will be awarded with a certificate as you pass each level. The Accredited Centre will award the certificate on behalf of the ABCTT.

What are the aims of NICAS and NIBAS?


NICAS aimsNICAS group at the wall (credit Patricia Novelli)
  • to develop climbing movement skills and improve levels of ability
  • to learn climbing rope-work and how to use equipment appropriately
  • to develop risk assessment and risk management skills in the sport
  • to work as a team, communicate with, and trust a climbing partner
  • to provide a structure for development, motivation and improved performance
  • to develop an understanding of the sport, its history and future challenges
  • to provide a record of personal achievement
  • to point the way to further disciplines and challenges in climbing beyond the scheme.

The five NICAS levels are:



1. New Climber
An entry level aimed at novices that recognises their ability to climb safely under supervision.

2. Foundation Climber
Aimed at promoting good practice in climbing and bouldering unsupervised on an artificial wall.

3. Technical Climber
A more advanced top-roping and bouldering award that focusses on developing technique and movement skills. This is aimed at ensuring a candidate possesses the knowledge and skill to climb and belay safely at any climbing facility (whether or not under supervision or with back-up) and operate in a responsible manner. Achievement at this level is broadly equivalent to a pass at GCSE.

4. Lead Climber
Concentrating on the skills required to lead climb proficiently. Aimed at developing a self-motivated climber who has a wide range of skills and has reached a high level of competence, with a desire to progress by identifying and setting goals.

5. Advanced Climber
The top-level award that focuses on improving performance, a deeper understanding of climbing systems and the wider world of climbing, as well as experience of local and national competitions.
NIBAS aimsHappy bouldering girl closeup (c) Andy Day
  • to develop climbing movement skills and improve levels of ability
  • to learn how to use equipment appropriately
  • to develop risk assessment and risk management skills in the sport
  • to work as a team, communicate with, and trust other boulderers
  • to provide a structure for development, motivation and improved performance
  • to develop an understanding of the sport, its history and ethics
  • to provide a record of personal achievement
  • to point the way to further disciplines and challenges in climbing beyond the scheme.

The five NIBAS levels are:



1. New Boulderer
An entry level award for candidates who wish to learn what bouldering is as a physical activity and how to use a bouldering wall safely.

2. Foundation Boulderer
Aimed at helping the candidate to understand how a bouldering wall works, and basic preparation and control while bouldering, with an introduction to equipment and movement skills.

3. Competent Boulderer
Corresponding to most bouldering–only centres’ “membership” standards. This is aimed at ensuring a candidate possesses the knowledge and skill to boulder safely at any bouldering facility and operate in a responsible manner.

4. Skilled Boulderer
Aimed at developing a self–motivated boulderer who has a wide range of skills and has reached a high level of competence, with a desire to progress by identifying and setting goals.

5. Performance Boulderer
The top–level award that focuses on improving performance, with advanced skills and knowledge of training and bouldering as well as experience of local and national competitions.




This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. See our Cookie Policy for further details on how to block cookies.
I am happy with this
 

Cookies

What is a Cookie

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is a piece of data stored by a website within a browser, and then subsequently sent back to the same website by the browser. Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember things that a browser had done there in the past, which can include having clicked particular buttons, logging in, or having read pages on that site months or years ago.

NOTE : It does not know who you are or look at any of your personal files on your computer.

Why we use them

When we provide services, we want to make them easy, useful and reliable. Where services are delivered on the internet, this sometimes involves placing small amounts of information on your device, for example, your computer or mobile phone. These include small files known as cookies. They cannot be used to identify you personally.

These pieces of information are used to improve services for you through, for example:

  • recognising that you may already have given a username and password so you don’t need to do it for every web page requested
  • measuring how many people are using services, so they can be made easier to use and there’s enough capacity to ensure they are fast
  • analysing anonymised data to help us understand how people interact with our website so we can make them better

You can manage these small files and learn more about them from the article, Internet Browser cookies- what they are and how to manage them

Learn how to remove cookies set on your device

There are two types of cookie you may encounter when using our site :

First party cookies

These are our own cookies, controlled by us and used to provide information about usage of our site.

We use cookies in several places – we’ve listed each of them below with more details about why we use them and how long they will last.

Third party cookies

These are cookies found in other companies’ internet tools which we are using to enhance our site, for example Facebook or Twitter have their own cookies, which are controlled by them.

We do not control the dissemination of these cookies. You should check the third party websites for more information about these.

Log files

Log files allow us to record visitors’ use of the site. The CMS puts together log file information from all our visitors, which we use to make improvements to the layout of the site and to the information in it, based on the way that visitors move around it. Log files do not contain any personal information about you. If you receive the HTML-formatted version of a newsletter, your opening of the newsletter email is notified to us and saved. Your clicks on links in the newsletter are also saved. These and the open statistics are used in aggregate form to give us an indication of the popularity of the content and to help us make decisions about future content and formatting.